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Ingredient

Sucrose is made up of two simple sugars: glucose and fructose. It is, of course, found in fruit and vegetables, but is usually obtained from sugar beet and sugar cane.

The various sugar extraction and refining processes are actually quite simple and share common procedures. Sugar beets are cut and soaked in hot water whereas sugar cane is crushed, but both produce a "juice" or "sauce" that is rich in sugars and that is then filtered and purified. The liquid is heated to evaporate the water contained in the juice, leaving small crystals floating in the syrup, which become bigger and more numerous as the product is cooled. The crystals are separated from the syrup in a centrifuge, they are then dried and become the sugar we recognise and use every day. The sucrose obtained in this way is 99.7% pure.

Other types of sugars exist in nature and these are nowadays used as sweeteners or because of the special properties they possess; for example, fructose is typically present in ripe fruits and honey, lactose is found in milk and dairy products. Finally, glucose and dextrose, a particular form of glucose, are also found in ripe fruits.

Kinder selection and quality control

Seeing as sucrose really is so important, its raw material selection criteria are particularly rigid. Kinder only uses suppliers that grow non-GMO (non-genetically modified) sugar beet in Europe and only buys sugar cane from where the best production is guaranteed. In fact, a wide range of non-European countries are used to guarantee the high quality of its products.

Kinder and Ferrero pay particular care and attention to the working conditions of those who produce their sugar and to the environment it comes from. All of Kinder's sugar beet suppliers are members of CEFS (Comité Européen des Fabricants de Sucre), which defends their rights and the land they work on. Both Kinder and Ferrero are, furthermore, members of BONSUCRO, an association that strives to improve the economic, social and environmental conditions of all companies involved in sugar cane production.

Did you know?

Every recipe needs its own type of sugar. When white sugar is used in biscuits, they remain hard and crumbly, while cane sugar makes them light and springy. It is a good idea to use cane sugar in cakes because it absorbs more water leaving them soft and moist.